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damien

Hair loss emotions and feelings

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Just found a really interesting piece about how hair loss affects men and their confidence levels. Not sure i entirely agree with everything that is said, but it makes interesting reading nevertheless.

 

What do you make of it? Can you relate to any of it? I know I can

http://www.emedexpert.com/tips/hair-loss-effects.shtml

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unfortuantly true and as such I hid away from life for 30 yrs and was suicidal a good few times in those 30 yrs , used to actualy be sick looking at myself - Gym saved me until I found HIS.

 

Can look at myself now but the mental scars will never completly go , thats why I stay on the forum long after im finished with my sessions - if I can help anyone who is where I was before my treatment then what I suffered/ gave up has not been in total vain .

 

Doctors dont care but the HIS brothers do .

Do you really think doctors don't care, or is it that they don't have training or access to treatments in this area? Hair loss is a cosmetic thing and the NHS is pretty lax on cosmetic stuff, despite the array of mental and emotional disorders they can cause.

 

Unless you want a boob job

http://boobjobsontheservice.co.uk/

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Went to see my doctor at 20 years old to get an oppinion on what might be causing my thinning hair. Well no word of a a lie the response I got was as if I was completely wasting his time. He pointed me towards a bottle of jollop (Regain) usherd me out the door and said don't worry you'll always have hair! When I think back those were the worst days for me when it just started receding and there was absolutely no where to turn to. If he just had a little more professionalism and sympathy he could have talked me out of the awful hair transplant surgery that was on offer in those days, rotten 'hair systems', and pills that don't work and I wouldn't have wasted thousands.

At least now thank god for the internet and forums like this where there is support.

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My old Dentists best mate didnt leave his house for 10 yrs , for anything !!

A mate of an ex girlfriend did take his own life,

 

these days at the docs you get your 5 mins then its " next" - when I was under the hospital Pyschiatrist my emergency appointment was months to wait apsolutly useless .

 

If it were a boob job or sex change id get it for free as it affected my Mental Health - instead I spent thousands I didnt have on transplants which failed - finaly found HIS . Id actualy have a life now if I wasnt so heavily in debt do to chasing an answer to my hairloss .

 

I believe HIS should be on the NHS becouse of its high success rate  and its ability to alter someones life for the better to such a degree .

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My old Dentists best mate didnt leave his house for 10 yrs , for anything !!

A mate of an ex girlfriend did take his own life,

 

these days at the docs you get your 5 mins then its " next" - when I was under the hospital Pyschiatrist my emergency appointment was months to wait apsolutly useless .

 

If it were a boob job or sex change id get it for free as it affected my Mental Health - instead I spent thousands I didnt have on transplants which failed - finaly found HIS . Id actualy have a life now if I wasnt so heavily in debt do to chasing an answer to my hairloss .

 

I believe HIS should be on the NHS becouse of its high success rate  and its ability to alter someones life for the better to such a degree .

Ian Watson held a senior position within the NHS before he left to set up HIS, and he's been fighting to get SMP on the NHS ever since. This is the closest we got. A million miles to go but at least it's an acknowledgement

http://www.hishairclinic.com/nhs-recognises-dermatography-as-a-viable-hair-loss-solution/

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I can relate to a lot of the article.

 

David, you are not alone, I to have gone through that same emotional rollercoaster and still on it. Feeling that the physical scars and emotional scars of losing my hair my never heal and I will take them to my grave. I can only hope that I have the courage and fortitude to follow my heart. SMP may be an answer. But issues still need to be worked out. It feels good to talk about it and know your not alone.

 

Thanks.

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"Everyones life is full of shit - its just different shit "  

 

Yes the main reason of my depression was my hairloss but I do believe in the princible of " the straw that broke the camels back " , but which I mean in my case as losing most hair by 19/20 made me less able to cope with other problems of which I did have a lot .

 

At 12 I had a mass of dark hair which in all honesty looked awefull but I was obsessed with getting it looking how I wanted , Id spend hours trying to get it right / use hairsprays etc , wouldnt go outside on a windy day without a flat cap on . To then lose it at 18/19/20 was such a loss , I still remember the day I noticed I was losing it - it was a Sunday lunch time I looked it the mirror and nearly collasped and went histerical (they say you dont notice until you have lost 40% and that was true with me).

 

The irony of it is although I didnt bother with relationships I did Father a child who is now 23 and unfortuantly he did see me suicidal on a few occasions which is not good , the last time was about 6 months before I found HIS but that was the breaking point for him - he now never wants to see me again or have anything to do with me - he didnt even send a card when my Dad / his Grandad died this xmas - ive not seen him in 3 years .

 

Unfortuantly although we can go through hell the folks we hurt most are those we love .

 

As someone who joined the Army at 16 (and was injured and medic'd out by 17) Im acutly aware some of my Platoon didnt live to be 21 and as such I should thank my lucky stars but some folks can handle different things from others .

 

If you use War as an example , in WW2 flyers got medals for bravery as did Submariners - but if you put the flyer in the Sub and the Submariner in the plane they both could of ended up shot for cowardice . Different folks can handle different stresses .

 

I'm sorry to hear your story. I dont want to go into detail but I can relate to the Dad stuff, although in my case I'm the son, not the Father.

 

Life has a way of working itself out, but for this to happen you have to try to look at things from a positive perspective, and to never forget that people are fundamentally good. Life just happens sometimes and we drift apart for various reasons. There is always something to look forward to, so dont let life grind you down. There is too much to experience and too many people who need your love and support to just give up. Even if that sometimes feels like its the only option you have, its not. Tomorrow is a new day, and yesterday is already in the past.

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Life has always taught me, no matter how bad you think your life is, there's always somebody out there who's got it worse than you. So count your blessings. I hope things from here on in - go your way.

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Ian Watson held a senior position within the NHS before he left to set up HIS, and he's been fighting to get SMP on the NHS ever since. This is the closest we got. A million miles to go but at least it's an acknowledgement

http://www.hishairclinic.com/nhs-recognises-dermatography-as-a-viable-hair-loss-solution/

 

Might not be a popular opinion but I would be highly against SMP being on the NHS because not only would the quality suffer immeasurably (as it always does with socialised healthcare) but it would set a precedent opening the door for thousands of expensive procedures that have tenuous links with anxiety/confidence problems. There was a case of a girl getting a boob job on the NHS which was very controversial and while I think hairloss is far more of a blow than a girl having small boobs, the principle is the same. 

 

If anything I'd like the NHS to shift away from cosmetic procedures entirely, maybe working on providing better human support and access to specialists for hairloss. If we didn't have to pay so much in taxes to fund the bloated NHS then maybe more people could afford quality private SMP work.

 

Now my inner capitalist is just ranting...

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Might not be a popular opinion but I would be highly against SMP being on the NHS because not only would the quality suffer immeasurably (as it always does with socialised healthcare) but it would set a precedent opening the door for thousands of expensive procedures that have tenuous links with anxiety/confidence problems. There was a case of a girl getting a boob job on the NHS which was very controversial and while I think hairloss is far more of a blow than a girl having small boobs, the principle is the same. 

 

If anything I'd like the NHS to shift away from cosmetic procedures entirely, maybe working on providing better human support and access to specialists for hairloss. If we didn't have to pay so much in taxes to fund the bloated NHS then maybe more people could afford quality private SMP work.

 

Now my inner capitalist is just ranting...

 

The aim was for private companies to perform treatments using NHS funding, not for the NHS to offer their own low rent version. Can you imagine?. As long as it doesnt turn into a bidding war for the lowest price of course. That could cause some damage. I don't entirely disagree with your point though :)

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It does not take a Ph.D. in human psychology to guess that any condition which greatly changes appearance is likely to cause emotional and mental stress (often severe).  Cystic acne or early balding at age 16 can induce severe trauma and a sense of low self esteem in any human male who is otherwise healthy.  For this reason, I think of HIS as having a much more sensitive role than simply restoring a hairline or filling in a balding patch.  (which is all superficial)  The real effect is on healing the emotional scars carried and encoded in that client's neural networks (think of it oldwise if you will as "their heart").  That is why, if HIS continues to be honest and charge reasonably, their reputation will grow quickly.  Buisnesses or firms which fix material damage are common (the back fender of my car needs retouching), those that repair emotional trauma and turn back the clock to restore life, are exceedingly rare. 

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