JumpingJack

In ten years time

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I would like to ask the experts that as our SMP fades through time, but does not dissapear entirely, after 2,3 or even 4 or 5 top ups how can the double dotting be avoided? I am not sure of the correct phrase but what I mean is avoiding the full head tattoo (painted on) look? Im still quite young and if I get a topup every 3 years there wont be much bare skin left to put dots into.. Thanks for any advice

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Thanks Jason, and I read your blog and am happy for you you got sorted mate but is there any chance Ed the forum admin could put an experts opinion on this? just a bit worried about it tbh (btw I have already had a few Hishair sessions already)

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If you look after it the fading is extremely slow long term. I'm not even convinced I am experiencing long term fading. My treatment is identical now compared to my last session in Feb 2014. I fully expect it will hold up 10 years from now but keep in mind I'm not doing roofing in the summer in Texas.

But if a touch up is required then so long as the technician uses a very light touch he should be able to do small enough dots that they will contrast nicely against the older lighter dots.

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Hi Jumping Jack. The starting point for a practitioner performing a touch up is to study the degree of fading, as Lt Col. Kojak said for some there is almost none at all. For those clients a liberal sprinkling is all that is needed, sometimes using a slightly darker pigment to refresh. You would be amazed at how a very short touch up can make a dramatic improvement to an old SMP that looked OK before anyway. 

For clients who have experienced a greater degree of fading, due to sun exposure or lifestyle choices, Then the job is to refresh with new work scattered evenly but always keeping to a minimum, less is definitely more. The helmet effect you describe just does not happen.

It is not a repeat of the original experience, you can be confident your practitioner will understand what is required.

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On 15/02/2018 at 2:34 PM, ed@hishairclinic.com said:

Hi Jumping Jack. The starting point for a practitioner performing a touch up is to study the degree of fading, as Lt Col. Kojak said for some there is almost none at all. For those clients a liberal sprinkling is all that is needed, sometimes using a slightly darker pigment to refresh. You would be amazed at how a very short touch up can make a dramatic improvement to an old SMP that looked OK before anyway. 

For clients who have experienced a greater degree of fading, due to sun exposure or lifestyle choices, Then the job is to refresh with new work scattered evenly but always keeping to a minimum, less is definitely more. The helmet effect you describe just does not happen.

It is not a repeat of the original experience, you can be confident your practitioner will understand what is required.

Ed. It's been a couple of years now since my last SMP It's faded quite a bit, been a while since I've been on the forum as been too busy enjoying my results. But it has faded. What's a ball park figure for touch up, I've heard around £600, but also heard if people being quoted near the original 1000s , this seems too much when you have forked out initially. is this anywhere near ? I know your gonna say I need to go in for a consultation ,and I will , just wanna know a ball park figure of what they have cost  people in the past .Cheers

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Hi Dasher. You are right... I am going to advise you to get a consultation. But unless your fading has been dramatic I cannot see why the cost should approach the original. As per my earlier post in this thread, a touch up is not the same process as the original treatment. It usually requires a scattered sprinkling of fresh work to put the zing back. Let us know how you get on.

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