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stewart1987

Could you invent a machine to perform SMP?

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I was watching repeats of Tomorrow's World on Youtube.

Not that I'm a saddo or anything. Just I'm unemployed until

later this month.

And it got me thinking - about robots and shit.

 

So I googled to see if anyone has made a tattoo robot and they have,

see the video below, and as silly as it sounds... isn't it possible?

 

Now, not that I'm trying to put any practitioners out of a job, or that this

could ever even become a reality. It's just an idea.

 

I know I'm speaking wankerphetically. But I'm saying this robot

would make it's money back in no time.

 

Also... wouldn't a robot be better? I know that the HIS practitioners

are amazing, but they're only human, and their wrist is gonna get tired.

But robots would keep going away, with the same pressure, and at a faster speed.

 

You could still have a guy programming the system before it gets to work,

put it what density, add the ink and go.

It could have sessions done in like an hour. 

 

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Never knew a piece of kit like this existed, always figured it could but never seen a live version, very impressed with how the outcome of the cross was too. In this day and age I wouldn't see why not, the possibilities are infinite for things like this, I assume the needle has a system that refills itself automatically as it continues otherwise the ink would probably have faded out in the video at various points. It would cost a lot to get something like that though and then have it programmed perfectly to replicate its intended design, I know there's a robot called the ARTAS that can do hair transplants (FuE) at an increased work rate compared to an doctor doing it, requires programming correctly and mapping by the technician but after that its relatively smooth sailing, it has its drawbacks though, the extraction tool has to be bigger than most surgeon's would use so it would have an increased chance of FuE scars, I also wasn't very impressed with the pricing the people who use them make out its much cheaper but in reality its only marginally cheaper.

 

Drawbacks I could see, each head is different, different density's, follicle sizes, design requirements, head sizes, then you'd have the problem of needing to know a company who would produce such a machine that was programmed to do these tasks in an SMP fashion and have various settings you could use to do different tasks and each head would have to be mapped out with the robot so it knew beginning points and boundary's of application, would need a specific over the head module too. Estimated price to get something like this into reality? Millions. So it could be made into a reality but I'd doubt it ever will unless a 3rd party company took it up as a project, wouldn't be very lucrative though there aren't many big SMP providers and I doubt any small ones would fork out a lot of money for something like this.

 

Definitely an interesting idea though! I'd be up for getting a tattoo by a machine on a body part if it would be perfect in accuracy.

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Yeah Nightwood, you're right. 

You're a lot more logical than I am.

 

But still think there'd be a way around all that.

Though, like you said - it'd be expensive.

 

It'd need to scan the head first using some star trek shit,

to determine size and where to stop. Or some poor sod would end

up with SMP on his ears.

 

Maybe this has already been invented and that's where Spanish86 got his done?

That'd explain everything actually.

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Hahaha I knew you'd say that after I read 'on his ears'.

 

Perfectly logical idea mate, just an expensive one to produce.

 

I say we get in touch with William Shatner, maybe he can offer us some of his invaluable experience into interplanetary travel and we can get this technology then use it to make millions or maybe just ask for Leonard Nimoy's autograph....yeah lets do that instead!

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It's not Star Trek shit LOL, it is application of calculus, differential equations, dynamical systems and mechanics (kinematics).  Robots that could perform SMP very accurately, already exist and all that would be required would be reprogramming them to the new task.  Robots like this are already used in many industries such as robotic watch building by Seiko in Japan and micro arc welding by major autio builders. There is a bit of a problem with immobilizing the head, which would not be comfortable for the client after more than 30 min or so, but that could be overcome with some adaptations. (notice in the vid above how the client's arm is held immobilie) The only downsides would be the cost, as an industrial robot which can perform SMP well would likely be in the $200,000 or greater price range.  And then there is the pain level to consider.  Could you take a straight non-stop 7000 dot SMP treatment in 115 minutes with no breaks?  If you can, your tougher than I am :)

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I should also mention a secret that Chinese tortuturers from Medieval times and modern accupuncturists know; If you puncture the skin very rapidly with a needle, even if you draw no blood, you can, if enough area is covered quickly, induce a shock response in a patient or client.  A robot SMP machine that could lay down 7000 dots in three minutes on a client's skull, would in many cases produce a shock reaction from the patient some minutes after they walked out of the chair.

 

Yes, I realize that sounds like some Ripley's Believe It of Not bullshit, but it is actually true.

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The ARTAS machines for hair transplant surgery look promising so I dont doubt for a moment that its theoretically possible for a machine to aid an SMP treatment, but from what I understand even ARTAS needs significant input from the surgeon. Nightwood probably knows more about this than me, as I've only looked into it briefly.

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@Damien Yeah it requires a technician and close watchful eye the entire time, the surgeon must map the entire head out via the machine picking the extractions he wants to take as to not take vast amounts from one space, the technician would typically be the doctor himself as all doctors decide what comes out and what stays in, he'd need to gauge the depth too as to not burrow too deep or too short. Its much faster at working after its been correctly calibrated though, only downside being they have to use (last I checked) 1mm or a little more extraction punches, most surgeon's these days would use a 0.8mm punch down toward 0.65mm the smaller the tool the lesser the chance of scarring, that's why when you see 'punch scars' around here compared to the modern technique there like huge gaping voids because they used obscenely oversized tools back then. 1mm wouldn't really produce a very big scar, it would in-fact at most be 1mm in diameter but it adds that slightly higher risk. Its good for biggish FuE sessions, doesn't tire the surgeons hands out really it practically eliminates the doctor as a requirement unless he does the grunt work of planting the follicles once done which a lot do not. I don't think it does recipient sites as that's more a design choice based on the head, so I guess that's one aspect the human interaction is needed for.

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So the easier solution is for the practishioner working on building up his wrist muscle - nuff said !!!!

Men have been doing that all the time...... Sometimes twice a day. I think "working" less on the wrist for recovery is the solution here.

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